MA.PANT

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Social Justice Series: Sentient AI, Intimacy, and Ethics
Have you ever wondered what ethical dilemmas would become apparent with the introduction of sentient artificial intelligence? Or perhaps more specifically, what problems might lie in having intimate relationships…
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Social Justice Series: Neofascism Knocking at the Door
There has been a great deal of discussion about the recent presidential election, with many people attempting to understand what made this such a unique moment in our countries history. Some, however,…
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The Question of Hope in Palestinian Resistance
The Social Justice Series continued this week with guest speaker Irene Calis. Calis recently relocated to the DC area from Rhodes University in South Africa. She is an anthropologist concerned with issues…
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The Art of Social Justice
The weekly Social Justice Colloquium continues to offer the opportunity for insightful dialogue on Monday afternoons in the Battelle Thompkins humanities lab. This week attendees were able to experience…
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In Case You Missed It: The Social Justice Series
This year’s Social Justice Series is in full swing at American University. It kicked off on September 19th with Professor Cathy Schneider. The series highlights the work of anthropologists who are committed…
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PAC: National Nurses United Panel
This weekend was an exciting time for the Anthropology department at AU. We hosted our 13th annual Public Anthropology Conference. Speakers represented a multitude of schools and organizations. One particularly…
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PAC: Bridging the Gap between Academia and Activism
This year’s Public Anthropology Conference (PAC) had no shortage of amazing speakers discussing a broad range of interesting and important topics. From drone usage to minority solidarity, the various…
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Public Anthropology Conference: 2016
Announcing the 2016 Public Anthropology Conference American University’s Department of Anthropology registration is currently open for the 13th annual Public Anthropology Conference.  This year’s…
5 Anthropology Conferences to Attend This School Year
5 Anthropology Conferences to Attend This School Year
  When anthropologists come together, the most important conversations of our day evolve, deepen, and expand. We’re proud of the rich exchange of ideas that happens in our own anthropology department,…
Homo naledi fossils
Watch: Becca Peixotto on the Homo Naledi Excavation
In 2013, two cavers came across human remains in the Rising Star Cave system near Johannesburg, South Africa, and American paleoanthropologist Lee Berger was eager to get a look at them. The only problem?…
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A Look Inside the Master’s in Public Anthropology
At its core, anthropology is about people. The master’s in public anthropology helps students discover ways to inspire change on the issues they care most about – and fight for justice on behalf of…
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Recapping the Lavender Languages Conference
The 23rd Annual Lavender Languages Conference was held at American University on February 12-14, 2016. Directed by Professor William L. Leap, “Lav 23” offered a venue for discussion of language and…
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4 Anthropologists that Inspire Our Students
AU public anthropology students have diverse interests shaped by their experiences, their teachers, and their immersion in the work of established anthropologists. We reached out to four students to learn…
Top 5 Reasons to Choose Public Anthropology
Top 5 Reasons to Choose Public Anthropology
Public anthropology students are passionate about history and culture. They put their hands to work unearthing new species and studying culture on a global scale. They conduct research that makes a real…
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Revolutionary Medicine: Anthropology in Action
Student Beth Geglia arrived at AU with professional accomplishments in human rights campaigning, crisis intervention, and language interpretation—and with a dedication to activism, particularly in Central…
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Deaf Communities in Sub-Saharan Africa Lead the Way
BY: KATLIN CHADWICK, WRITER AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY In 1996, Uganda was the first country in the world to have an elective deaf Member of Parliament. In 2008, South Africa wrote South African Sign Language…
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Featured Alumnus: Documentary Filmmaker Keenan Holmes
We are proud to highlight the achievements of recent public anthropology master’s student Keenan Holmes, who screened his first full-length documentary, Indigenous Eyes on DC, at Native American Lifelines…
The team lays out fossils of H. naledi at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Evolutionary Studies Institute. The new species of human relative was discovered by a team led by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand deep inside a cave located outside Johannesburg, South Africa. The find was announced by the University of the Witwatersrand, the National Geographic Society and the South African National Research Foundation and published in the journal eLife. 
Photo by Robert Clark/National Geographic
PERMITTED USE: These images may be downloaded or are otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for media/news coverage or promotion of the National Geographic Society’s H. naledi announcement and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing sale, or resale of the images are prohibited.

DEFAULT: Failure to comply with the prohibitions and requirements set forth above will obligate the individual or entity receiving these images to pay a fee determined by the National Geographic Society.

Mandatory usage requirements for National Geographic magazine photos 1-10:

Please note:
A maximum of 5 images total may be used online
A maximum of 5 images total may be used on air
A maximum of 3 images total may be used in print


ONLINE: 
1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image

2. Must show the October cover of National Geographic magazine somewhere in the piece if using two (2) or more images
3. Provide a prominent link to http://natgeo.org/naledi
4. Mention that the images are from "the October issue of National Geographic magazine”

BROADCAST:
1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image

2. Show the October cover of National Geographic magazine at some point during the segment

3. Provide a verbal mention of "the October issue of National Geographic magazine”

PRINT:1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image2. Must show the Oct
Print Your Own 3D Fossils
How the Rising Star Project Exemplifies Public Anthropology “[The] Rising Star [Project] was the first time I’ve seen open science done successfully on such a large scale.” – Becca Peixotto,…
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Presenting the 2015 Public Anthropology Conference
The 12th Annual Public Anthropology Conference (PAC 2015) will take place this weekend on October 3-4. We’re excited to learn from public anthropologists and scholar-activists from a broad range of disciplines,…
The “underground astronauts” (left to right): Becca Peixotto, Alia Gurtov, Elen Feuerriegel, Marina Elliott, K. Lindsay (Eaves) Hunter and Hannah Morris. The team of scientists excavated the chamber where H. naledi, a new species of human relative, was discovered. The find was announced by the University of the Witwatersrand, the National Geographic Society and the South African National Research Foundation and published in the journal eLife.
Photo by John Hawks

PERMITTED USE: These images may be downloaded or are otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for media/news coverage or promotion of the H. naledi announcement and exclusively in conjunction thereof. Copying, distribution, archiving, sublicensing sale, or resale of the images are prohibited.


Mandatory usage requirements for photos 11-18 for ONLINE, 
BROADCAST and PRINT: 

1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image
2. Mention the find was announced by the University of the Witwatersrand, the National Geographic Society and the South African National Research Foundation and published in the journal eLife.
AU Student Part of Human Ancestor Excavation
  “By the time the interview was over, I knew that if by some miracle I got this chance, I was going to drop everything and go.” ~Becca Peixotto (far left in photo) By: Katlin Chadwick,…
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What Is Public Anthropology
Theory, Practice, and Social Justice What the dictionary might tell you: Public anthropology builds on other fields of anthropology to serve the public good—in ways you can see. What public anthropology…