Posts

Aerial View of DC

Why Study in DC? A Prime Location for Accounting and More

American University’s prime location in the nation’s capital means access to opportunities not found in other cities. For students in the Master’s in Accounting (MSA) program, this means gaining access to professional and alumni networks across the corporate, not-for-profit and government sectors. Our students, full-time and part-time alike, take full advantage of all the D.C. area has to offer to their careers.

Professional opportunities abound in Washington, D.C. Beyond the classroom, MSA students also enjoy access to a wide array of dynamic speakers over the course of their time in the program. These occasions serve as invaluable networking events, which often lead to internships and full-time jobs.

For current MSA student Jacob Spector, access to a thriving economy and to faculty who are leading professionals in the D.C. Metro area drove his decision to choose Kogod. Spector said, “Whether you’re interested in public, private or governmental accounting, there are myriad career options in D.C., as well as opportunities to visit many local firms’ offices during the semester. Faculty members have been instrumental in leading me toward my career of choice.”

Public accounting firms, private sector companies, non-profits and government agencies in the metropolitan area heavily recruit MSA students. Among MSA graduates of the past three years, 86 percent have gained employment in the DMV area. Many graduates enter leading local firms like KPMG, Deloitte, eTrade, Fannie Mae and Wells Fargo.

Internship placement is equally impressive. Nearly half of MSA students in 2015 completed internships at a wide range of corporations, non-profits and government agencies, including KPMG, AARP, Department of Housing and Community Development, US Department of Treasury, US Department of Defense, International Monetary Fund. Several of these internships led to full-time employment.

Our alumni also report competitive compensation numbers. The median salary of our newly employed alumni is just under $60,000 per year, and many alumni are receiving signing bonuses of between $2,500-$3,500.

Cultural diversity, music, restaurants, arts, recreation and, most importantly, unparalleled internship and job opportunities. A Kogod education represents all that D.C. has to offer. With direct proximity to a global community, access to a thriving professional network and a high success rate for full-time employment, the MSA program will position you for a job outcome that fits your professional and personal goals.

Learn how the MSA program at the Kogod School of Business positions you for success.

5 Anthropology Conferences to Attend This School Year

5 Anthropology Conferences to Attend This School Year

 

When anthropologists come together, the most important conversations of our day evolve, deepen, and expand. We’re proud of the rich exchange of ideas that happens in our own anthropology department, and we encourage students to engage with scholars from outside AU by attending conferences both on and off our campus.

Below are five conferences we have our eye on for the upcoming school year, and you can find more by exploring the calendar at at the American Anthropology Association.

 

Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C. Symposium

September 17, 2016

U.S. Navy Memorial and Naval Heritage Center, Washington, D.C.

The Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C. is dedicated to furthering understanding of the peoples of the Americas before the time of Columbus. This fall, their one-day symposium will explore “Divine Kinship: The Political Ideology of Pre-Columbian Rulers,” probing historical connections between the sacred and the political.

 

The Public Anthropology Conference 2016

October 8-9, 2016

Mary Graydon Center, AU, Washington, D.C.

AU’s own Public Anthropology Conference is in its 16th year, and this year’s theme is “Social Movements & Academia.” Together, we will explore concrete ways to strengthen collaborative efforts between activists and academics, with the goal of combatting social inequalities and injustices. The conference will highlight panels, papers, workshops, dialogues, posters, film, audio/visual displays, and performances.

 

Society for Applied Anthropology Annual Meeting

March 28–April 1, 2017

La Fonda on the Plaza Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico

The Society for Applied Anthropology is an association of professionals interested in making an impact on the quality of life in today’s world. Its members come from social and behavioral disciplines including anthropology, economics, sociology, planning, medicine, nursing, and law. The theme of the 77th annual meeting is “Trails, Traditions, and New Directions,” and papers are welcomes until October 15th.

 

Lavender Language & Linguistics Conference XXIV

April 28-30, 2017

University of Nottingham, UK

American University’s own Lavender Language & Linguistics Conference is hitting the UK in its 24th year. The call for papers is live until October 3rd, and the organizers have already received submissions from France, Brazil, Australia and the U.S. Conference topics will include language, sexuality and pedagogy, LGBTQ+ discourse and media representations, (Anti)homophobic and transphobic discourses, and much more.

 

Robyn Rafferty Mathias Student Research Conference

Spring 2017 (Check back for dates and details)

Katzen Arts Center, AU, Washington, D.C.

Each year, the AU College of Arts and Sciences invites undergraduate and graduate students to present original scholarly and creative work before faculty and colleagues. Now in its 27th year, the conference is funded in part by a generous grant from AU trustee and alumna Robyn Rafferty Mathias, and students from all disciplines are encouraged to enter and attend. Cash prizes will be awarded for outstanding presentations, and a professional presentation prize will be offered to graduate students to cover the cost of attendance at a professional, peer-reviewed national conference at which the student is presenting.

 

Our program invites students to join the most important conversations in the world of anthropology. Find out more about the master’s degree in public anthropology.

DC Collections

9 Washington DC Anthropology Organizations You Should Know About

Studying in our nation’s capital puts AU public anthropology students within reach of a number of dynamic, active organizations.

There are opportunities to connect with National Parks, to delve into the history of local schools, and to explore pre-Columbian civilizations. There are grants and fellowships to fund promising field research. There are countless smart, experienced professionals eager to share their knowledge with new anthropologists.

Check out these 9 organizations for a sample of what is at our students’ fingertips:

1. Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists

Our town is home to Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists (WAPA), the world’s largest regional association of anthropologists. WAPA is a great resource, offering opportunities for networking and learning. They host events, mail out jobs listings, and provide mentorships for their members.

2. The Smithsonian’s Department of Anthropology

Beyond the wealth of dinosaur bones and studies on animal evolution, the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History boasts an active Department of Anthropology. Their collections and archives, online databases and research programs serve as resources for our students’ work—and some of our students find internships and jobs with the Smithsonian.

3. The National Park Service’s Cultural Anthropology Program

The National Park Service has an amazing Cultural Anthropology Program that works to deepen the connections between cultural communities and the places that are central to their history and culture. They team up with a network of anthropologists across the country and with partner organizations. Their program office is based in D.C.

4. The Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, DC

The Pre-Columbian Society of Washington, D.C. (PCSWDC) is a community of people interested in the civilizations that populated the Americas before the time of Columbus. They host an annual symposium and a number of talks, discussions, and museum visits around D.C. and they also deliver a newsletter to interested parties outside the area.

5. Charles Sumner School Museum

The Charles Sumner School was among the first public school buildings opened for D.C.’s black community. The building now holds a museum housing public school archives and records and offers meeting spaces for events and gatherings.

6. The Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum

Opened in 1967 as the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, the Anacostia Community Museum has a strong history in the African American museum movement. It continues to offer documentation, exhibits, and programming concerned with D.C. communities – and it hosts interns and fellows.

7. The Explorer’s Club

The Explorer’s Club is an international professional organization based in New York, with a focus on supporting multidisciplinary field research. The Explorers’ Club Washington Group is the organization’s largest local chapter and hosts talks and events, such as a recent talk by underwater anthropologist Robert Neyland. They also offer Exploration and Field Research Grants to local graduate students.

8. The Cosmos Club Foundation

The Cosmos Club is a privates social club for individuals who have distinguished themselves in the science, literature, and the arts and humanities. Their foundation offers small, highly competitive research grants for D.C. graduate students whose work promises to increase public knowledge. The Club invites the winners to present their research, and hopes that many recipients will go on to become members of the Club themselves.

9. The Institute for Policy Studies

The Institute for Policy Studies is the nation’s oldest progressive, multi-issue think tank. The organization brings together public scholars and organizers to carry out work focused on social justice issues. They offer fellowships, jobs and internships, in addition to putting on events.

 

Our program invites students to blend real-world experiences with their coursework. Find out more about the master’s degree in public anthropology.

AU anthropology students march in DC.

A Look Inside the Master’s in Public Anthropology

At its core, anthropology is about people. The master’s in public anthropology helps students discover ways to inspire change on the issues they care most about – and fight for justice on behalf of local and global communities.

Our program is distinguished in part by its location. DC offers a wealth of access points for students to develop their understanding of global and domestic challenges and power structures, and our students balance coursework with opportunities to immerse themselves in the DC metro area.

In this video, you’ll hear from associate professor Adrienne Pine and master’s in public anthropology graduate Becca Peixotto about how the program opens opportunities for discovery.

 

If you want to discover ways to push for change and justice, learn more about the master’s in public anthropology.